Test Tower of Light

A ceremonial throwing of the switch cast the 246-m thyssenkrupp test tower in Rottweil, Germany, within the glow of 44 spotlights at sunset on Valentine’s Day.

Love was literally in the air in Rottweil, Germany, on Valentine’s Day, when the first couple to be wed inside the thyssenkrupp Elevator test tower was invited back to turn on the 246-m-tall structure’s architectural lighting system. On February 14, at sunset local time — 5:44 p.m. — the couple, married last year at the 220-m point inside the test tower, threw the switch that instantly bathed the landmark structure in the warm glow of 44 spotlights, allowing architects Werner Sobek and Helmut Jahn to realize their vision of a “Tower of Light.”

The tower has become a popular attraction in Rottweil, the oldest city in Germany’s Baden-Wuerttemberg state. Residents and shop owners were invited to put lights in their windows in return so that a veritable “dialogue of lights,” a representation of the relationship between the town and the test tower, could commence.

“The nighttime lighting has been an integral part of my design concept from the very beginning,” said Sobek. “The lighting had to be just as tender and virtually ‘immaterial’ as the tower’s fabric shell itself: elegant, unobtrusive, light as a feather — and by no means colorful or garish.”

More than a quarter of a million visitors have been awed by the view from the tower’s observation deck, the highest in Germany, since construction was completed in 2017. thyssenkrupp uses the one-of-a-kind facility to test MULTI, the world’s first ropeless elevator for high-rise buildings, as well as conventional high-speed elevators.

The tower lights will be switched on every evening, except during various weeks each year when bird migrations are taking place.

Elevator Ad One of Superbowl LIII’s Funniest

Yes, the game was boring and featured a team that shouldn’t even have been there (thanks refs), and the halftime show was laughable (Adam Levine’s embarrassing striptease featuring Russian prison tattoos that looked freshly painted on), but the Big Game did deliver on a few funny ads, including this one starring Jason Bateman as an elevator attendant taking a couple of car shoppers “down, way down” to shop for their new vehicle. On the way down, they pass floors where the experience is arguably worse than car shopping: getting a root canal, taking the middle seat on a plane full of coughing travelers, enduring the “facts of life” talk from a parent, attending a vegan dinner party featuring “beetloaf” … You get the idea. Thanks to the couple choosing a certain brand of car and shopper experience, they bypass the dreaded car lot and vulture-like salespeople. Check it out above!!

Building Tall: China on the Rise; NYC No Slouch

Charting a Year of Skyscraper Construction

Visual Capitalist has a couple interesting (and, appropriately, visual) articles I wanted to share. The most recent, “Upward Momentum: Charting a Year of Skyscraper Construction,” includes the graph above as an example of how Southeast Asia (and China, especially) are coming on strong in high-rise building. However, it also notes “A New Era of American Skyscrapers,” in which it says the U.S. is embracing taller buildings again after a 20-odd-year lull. “Last year alone, the U.S. added 14 new skyscrapers into the mix, particularly in New York City (NYC), where construction cranes dot the horizon. In the past decade, NYC has added 25 new skyscrapers to its iconic skyline,” the source reports.

As Visual Capitalist shows and explains in “A Century of New York City’s Evolving Skyline,” this NYC trend is showing no signs of slowing down: “Between now and 2022, 44 skyscraper projects are expected to be completed in the United States, with the vast majority being built in the Big Apple.” This second article delves much further into the NYC skyline, with a bit of history and forecasting.