Elevator Ad One of Superbowl LIII’s Funniest

Yes, the game was boring and featured a team that shouldn’t even have been there (thanks refs), and the halftime show was laughable (Adam Levine’s embarrassing striptease featuring Russian prison tattoos that looked freshly painted on), but the Big Game did deliver on a few funny ads, including this one starring Jason Bateman as an elevator attendant taking a couple of car shoppers “down, way down” to shop for their new vehicle. On the way down, they pass floors where the experience is arguably worse than car shopping: getting a root canal, taking the middle seat on a plane full of coughing travelers, enduring the “facts of life” talk from a parent, attending a vegan dinner party featuring “beetloaf” ‚Ķ You get the idea. Thanks to the couple choosing a certain brand of car and shopper experience, they bypass the dreaded car lot and vulture-like salespeople. Check it out above!!

Elevators Change People’s Outlook, Charm Clients in London

A “living room” with a comfy couch, a 1980s disco, an invitation to take a stand on whether you prefer dogs or cats — these are among interiors of six elevators at Conran Design Group’s London headquarters. The ad agency elaborately redesigned the cabs to illustrate how a mundane experience, such as riding in an elevator, can be transformed into something that makes an impact on a person’s day. So far, the firm reports, it’s worked, creating a buzz among clients and even prompting them to return with other people (and potential future clients) in tow.

Elevator cab as 1980s disco, complete with boombox; image from Adweek

Hold on tight!! Cab creates the illusion that you’re above a long, empty shaft; image from Adweek

One of the cab interiors even offers riders a scary thrill as its floor is realistically painted to look like you’re staring down into a long, empty shaft. Check out all the designs in the trade publication Adweek!

Elevators for Elevators in Buffalo

During the first half of the 20th century, Buffalo, New York, had the largest capacity for grain storage in the U.S. with more than 30 concrete grain elevators along the Buffalo River and Lake Erie. In addition to serving as monuments to a former prosperity¬† — the first grain elevator was built in Buffalo in 1842 and the last in the 1950s — the structures boast distinct historical features. Some of the remaining 20-odd facilities are being preserved and even reborn, such as one that is now a mixed-use building, Silos at Elk Street, that serves as headquarters for Young + Wright Architectural. After buying the property for only around US$5,000 at auction, the firm poured approximately US$3 million into its transformation, which includes an elevator (of the vertical-transportation, rather than grain-storage, variety). Young + Wright tells ELEVATOR WORLD the transformation includes a five-stop elevator by Schindler in a five-story, brick building that formerly housed drying operations for grain used to make beer. “We have not actually touched the silos portion of our building,” the firm’s Mark Gallivan says. So, this post might be a little misleading in that the elevator is not actually located in the former grain elevator. However, an elevator in a grain elevator could be coming to Buffalo soon as part of Erie Canal Harbor Development Corp.’s plan to transform the circa 1915 Connecting Terminal on the Outer Harbor into a public attraction with an outdoor viewing deck. The Connecting Terminal is already home to nightly light shows.

The five-stop Schindler elevator that serves the offices.