Test Tower of Light

A ceremonial throwing of the switch cast the 246-m thyssenkrupp test tower in Rottweil, Germany, within the glow of 44 spotlights at sunset on Valentine’s Day.

Love was literally in the air in Rottweil, Germany, on Valentine’s Day, when the first couple to be wed inside the thyssenkrupp Elevator test tower was invited back to turn on the 246-m-tall structure’s architectural lighting system. On February 14, at sunset local time — 5:44 p.m. — the couple, married last year at the 220-m point inside the test tower, threw the switch that instantly bathed the landmark structure in the warm glow of 44 spotlights, allowing architects Werner Sobek and Helmut Jahn to realize their vision of a “Tower of Light.”

The tower has become a popular attraction in Rottweil, the oldest city in Germany’s Baden-Wuerttemberg state. Residents and shop owners were invited to put lights in their windows in return so that a veritable “dialogue of lights,” a representation of the relationship between the town and the test tower, could commence.

“The nighttime lighting has been an integral part of my design concept from the very beginning,” said Sobek. “The lighting had to be just as tender and virtually ‘immaterial’ as the tower’s fabric shell itself: elegant, unobtrusive, light as a feather — and by no means colorful or garish.”

More than a quarter of a million visitors have been awed by the view from the tower’s observation deck, the highest in Germany, since construction was completed in 2017. thyssenkrupp uses the one-of-a-kind facility to test MULTI, the world’s first ropeless elevator for high-rise buildings, as well as conventional high-speed elevators.

The tower lights will be switched on every evening, except during various weeks each year when bird migrations are taking place.

Fox Business Segment Features New SnapCab Product

For nearly 25 years, elevator contractors have turned to SnapCab to design and manufacture interiors for both new installations and modernizations. The company has worked hard to make it easy to find simple solutions for customized cab walls and ceilings, engineered for quick installation. It took dedication and a certain kind of genius to develop the product line, and that genius has resulted in a new offering from the company: the Pod. A growing trend in workplaces today is the open-office concept. Instead of individual rooms or walled-off cubicles, the open office brings workers into a communal space of tables, couches and countertops that promotes collaboration and is designed for our mobile culture (think laptops, tablets and smartphones). But, there are times — such as when making an important phone call or meeting with a client — that having a little privacy and seclusion is a good thing. That’s where the Pod, a standalone quiet  room, comes into the picture. The producers at Fox Business liked the idea enough to feature it on their program, “Inside The Blueprint,” which you can watch by clicking on the video link above.

Elevator Spoken Here

The Visual Capitalist infographic “A World of Languages” plots out the world’s major languages and shows where they are dominant.

We live in a truly global economy, and nowhere is this more observable than in the elevator industry. The modern elevator may have had its genesis in the United States, but the largest markets today are China and India, countries racing to keep pace with exploding urban populations by building ever-taller residential buildings. Meanwhile, elevator-component manufacturing is becoming an important sector of the industrial economy of more and more countries. The big OEMs are all over this trend, but even mid-sized and smaller companies are looking for footholds and partnerships in far-away lands.

If there is anything all these lands have in common, it most certainly is not language. The people at Visual Capitalist, in yet another example of their knack for distilling complex subjects down to fascinating, easy-to-grasp graphic images, offer “A World of Languages,” a visual depiction of where the most-spoken mother tongues are dominant. If you’re planning to expand business abroad and want to put your college Spanish classes to good use, give it a look.