Nuclear Powered, Five-Deck Elevators: Frank Lloyd Wright’s Mile-High Tower

Double-deck elevators in Midland Square, Japan. Wright’s proposed skyscraper would have had 76 five-deck elevators; photo by Chris 73.

At a press conference in Chicago in 1956, when he was 87 years old, architect Frank Lloyd Wright unveiled his plan for what would come to be known as The Mile High Illinois, a skyscraper four times the height of the Empire State Building that would dwarf the world’s current tallest building, the 2,717-ft.-tall Burj Khalifa in Dubai, at 5,280 ft. The never-realized Mile High would have had more than 500 floors and be powered by 76, nuclear-powered, five-deck elevators. Even at that, a modern-day elevator consultant told The New Yorker this would have fallen far short. James Fortune said up to 225 elevators would have been needed. The architect’s “lost masterpiece” had a lot of other technical issues, which you can read all about in The Daily Beast.

thyssenkrupp CEOs Take Themselves Out to the Ballgame

thyssenkrupp Elevator recently inked a deal with the Atlanta Braves to establish its thyssenkrupp Americas complex, including what will be the tallest elevator test tower in the U.S., on property just north of downtown Atlanta. Housing more than 800 employees, the new complex will be within a stone’s throw of SunTrust Park, home of the National Baseball League’s Braves. Company executives took the opportunity to watch a Braves game when they were in town for the announcement, and Communications Specialist Dennis Van Milligan captured this video of thyssenkrupp Elevator CEO Andreas Schierenbeck and thyssenkrupp Elevator Americas CEO Rich Hussey taking in some of the action, being welcomed by the announcer, and checking themselves out on the jumbotron!

A Swiftly Changing Landscape

A cool infographic by Raconteur accompanies Desjardins’ article posted on VisualCapitalist.com. You can check out a high-resolution version of the visual element through a link in the story.

In a fascinating peek into the not-so-distant future, Jeff Desjardins, writing on the website Visual Capitalist, takes a by-the-numbers look at how technology is fueling a swiftly shifting media landscape. When, and how, we get information has changed dramatically in just a few years, and if trends count for anything, bigger changes are ahead. As Desjardins puts it:

“Over your lifetime, the consumption of media and entertainment has already changed drastically.
“For Boomers and Gen Xers, the shift has been earth-shattering. Both generations will remember a time before mainstream computing when TV was dominated by the Big Three TV networks (NBC, ABC, and CBS), and newspapers and magazines were the main way to stay in touch with what was happening.
“Even millennials have seen fundamental shifts in consumption of media. After all, they experienced the rise of social media, online news, streaming, and digital video firsthand. Many of them will remember their college getting access to Facebook for the first time, the death of Napster, and the funny sounds their 28.8k modem made as it struggled to successfully download a single image file.”

It’s fair to assume that the coming changes will affect virtually everyone who consumes information. Of course, if you’re reading this, you’re already a little ahead of the game, and you probably know you can read ELEVATOR WORLD on your computer, phone or tablet. Where will you be reading it a couple of years from now?