CTBUH Says 2018 Was a Big Year for Tall Towers

This chart, courtesy of CTBUH, is a graphic representation of 50 years’ worth of tall building (200+ m) construction. Note the explosion in numbers of new skyscrapers over the past decade.

Last year didn’t quite match the record for skyscraper completions we saw in 2017, but an interactive look at 2018 in review, courtesy of the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH), shows that the tall trend isn’t close to abating. Some of the highlights:

  • 143 buildings of at least 200 m (656 ft.) were completed, just shy of 2017’s record of 147 and bringing the worldwide total to 1,478
  • Of the new buildings, 76% were in Asia
  • China led the world with 88 completions of towers at least 200 m tall; the city of Shenzhen alone had 14, nearly 10% of the worldwide total
  • Among all countries, the United States was a distant second place, with 13 completions
  • China also had the tallest building to complete, the 528-m (1,732-ft.) China Zun in Beijing
  • 19 cities around the world got a new tallest building
  • And, how’s this for a sky-high trend? There were 18 supertalls (skyscrapers standing at least 300 m [984 ft.]) completed worldwide, the most ever in one year.

The future of tall-building construction looks brighter than ever, thanks to the rapid urbanization of the global population. This year appears to be another big year for skyscraper news; check out ELEVATOR WORLD’s Web Exclusive for March.

CTBUH director takes the ride of his life at Jeddah Tower site

Dr. Antony Wood, executive director of the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH), recently got a firsthand look at the soon-to-be world’s tallest building, a tour that encompassed a bottom-to-top viewing of work going on at Jeddah Tower in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. Wood and his hosts, officials with tower developer Jeddah Economic Co. and contractor Saudi Binladin Group, made their way to the top of the structure, which at the time was level 56, some 252 meters above the ground. When complete, Jeddah Tower will stand at least 1,000 m tall and house hotel, residential and office space, among other uses, in its 167 stories, and will be the centerpiece of a huge development called Jeddah Economic City. Bringing the tour to a close in hair-raising fashion, Wood and his hosts rode down in a materials hoist lowered by one of the construction cranes, a trip that offered the group spectacular views not only of the work going on, but also of the Red Sea, Jeddah and the massive site of the development.

20 Mega-Tall Buildings By 2020

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Discovery News recently reported interesting information from the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) regarding the future of tall buildings.  According to CTBUH, in 2000, the average height of the tallest buildings was 1,230 feet. By 2010, that average rose to 1,440 feet and by 2020, the average height is expected to reach 1,962.  Thats tall!

CTBUH also predicts that within this decade, we will see a kilometer-tall building. That’s 3,280 feet!  As buildings become taller and taller, what do you think this means for vertical transportation?

You can view the 20 projected buildings by clicking here.