Cat Caper in the Underground

A red circle highlights the tiny kittens after they were discovered underneath an escalator unit at London’s Moorgate station; photo from the Daily Mail.

A lost mother cat found a hideaway she thought would be a safe place to give birth but, according to the Daily Mail, workers at a London underground station who found the mom and her new litter had to act fast to get them out of harm’s way. It seems mama made her “birthing suite” underneath a new escalator unit that was only hours away from a test run.

Mother and kittens, reunited; image courtesy of RSPCA via the Daily Mail

The unit is in the Moorgate station, one of London’s busiest tube stations, which has been undergoing a renovation and expansion to service the Crossrail Elizabeth Line. The workers got in touch with the Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (RSPCA), and animal welfare officer Siobhan Trinnaman responded to the scene. When she arrived, she found the four kittens in the escalator pit, but the mom was nowhere to be seen. “It’s very dangerous for cats, as it’s where the mechanism is to run the escalator,” said Trinnaman. With the escalator test scheduled for 6 p.m. that evening, Trinnaman had to act fast.

“They (the workers) were very concerned that if [the cats] remained there and the escalator was running, they would be injured or killed,” said Trinnaman. “I found the four tiny kittens and moved them to safety before setting a trap for the mum.” After a few hours, the mother was captured and reunited with her babies at the RSPCA’s local facility. The kittens, one girl and three boys, have been named after Tube stations. They are called Bow, Colin, Dale and Earl, after Bow Road, Collindale and Earl’s Court. The staff called the mom “Elizabeth,” after the Elizabeth line. They are trying to locate the owner, because the cat was wearing a collar, though she had no microchip.

Watch a video of the feline foundlings, courtesy of the Daily Mail.

Elevators Change People’s Outlook, Charm Clients in London

A “living room” with a comfy couch, a 1980s disco, an invitation to take a stand on whether you prefer dogs or cats — these are among interiors of six elevators at Conran Design Group’s London headquarters. The ad agency elaborately redesigned the cabs to illustrate how a mundane experience, such as riding in an elevator, can be transformed into something that makes an impact on a person’s day. So far, the firm reports, it’s worked, creating a buzz among clients and even prompting them to return with other people (and potential future clients) in tow.

Elevator cab as 1980s disco, complete with boombox; image from Adweek

Hold on tight!! Cab creates the illusion that you’re above a long, empty shaft; image from Adweek

One of the cab interiors even offers riders a scary thrill as its floor is realistically painted to look like you’re staring down into a long, empty shaft. Check out all the designs in the trade publication Adweek!

Photographer Captures World’s Biggest Cities at 12,000 Feet

Sydney

Sydney, Australia – click to enlarge

Tall buildings, bright lights, bustling traffic and the general buzz of people flow have been used to describe 21st century “mega-cities”. At street level, spectacular views abound in cities such as New York, Barcelona, Las Vegas, Sydney and London. But, what about the view from thousands of feet above these cities? SPECTACULAR! Photographer Vincent Laforet spent time in 2015 edging out of a helicopter door at heights of up to 12,000 feet photographing them. His new book, “AIR,” compiles the best and most spectacular aerial images captured throughout the project. However, you can view some of these images by viewing the video below. For more photo’s, and CNN’s feature article on this project, click here. ¬†Enjoy!

“When you are in any of these metropolitan areas on a street level, you feel a lot smaller and isolated,” Laforet told CNN over the phone from New York. “You are overwhelmed by the noise and the differences you see on the ground.”

“But when you are above these cities at several thousand feet or several kilometers, somehow they feel much more within grasp. You definitely feel more connected to the city and the people within it. There’s this energy that’s almost palpable.”