Looking Back at a Megaproject


Structural bracing near the portal just north of WMATA’s Grosvenor station; image courtesy of GWU Archives via Greater Greater Washington

Subways and commuter rail systems are important transportation options in most of the large cities in the U.S. They help reduce roadway congestion and the pollution produced by automobiles and, because they are either underground or elevated, they provide quick and efficient travel throughout metro areas. And, as we all know, thanks to the Americans With Disabilities Act, their stations and platforms are equipped with vertical transportation: large-capacity elevators and heavy-duty escalators that keep people on the move. In a nostalgic look back at the genesis of one of the nation’s best-known metro systems, website Greater Greater Washington has posted photographs documenting the construction of the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority (WMATA) Metrorail system serving the Washington, D.C., area, the first segment of which opened in 1976. The digitized photographs were released by the George Washington University (GWU) Archives, and include a rendering of the Wheaton Station escalators, the longest single-span escalators in the Western Hemisphere. If you’re into construction photographs, these will give you a fascinating look behind the scenes at the work involved in creating the nation’s second-busiest metro system.

thyssenkrupp Elevator 3D Artist/Photographer Shares Some of His Work

In a LinkedIn post titled “Animating ropes is way harder than it looks,” Ron Acord, a 3D artist/photographer/videographer for thyssenkrupp Elevator, shared a video clip of ropes in operation. Despite its brevity, the animation clearly shows how such a system works. Acord also captured some lovely images when thyssenkrupp Elevator completed the concrete core of its test tower near Atlanta. Upon completion, it will be the tallest tower in the Western Hemisphere at 420 ft. A couple of Acord’s test-tower photos are seen below.

How Skyscrapers Are Built

The following is a guest post by Christian Castillo, junior content marketing specialist at siegemedia. . . . Editor

Skyscrapers are pretty much a part of our everyday lives now. In fact, they’re so ingrained into that it’s sometimes hard to imagine they didn’t just come premade with the city. They are unique and highly useful buildings, and each one is unique to another. However, their methods of construction aren’t vastly different. The animated infographic below from BigRentz shows the most common method of how a skyscraper is built, and it’s interesting to see all the different moving parts that go into their construction.


how skyscrapers are built