Creativity in Cabins Combats Coronavirus

Our last post, “Fighting Coronavirus,” mentioned using toothpicks to push elevator buttons, but the concept is being taken to another level in this elevator. As The National reports, this elevator in Dubai has introduced a toothpick-bottle-foam method, instead of a bottle of hand sanitizer.

While the “six-foot rule” of social distancing can’t be followed in most cabins, like the one here, it seems prudent to do what you can in such an enclosed space as a typical elevator cab. This Central Park Towers, DIFC elevator (also in Dubai) sports tape and footprint stickers to help give guidelines for a bit of separation.

The article also has another example of the toothpick method that confuses me a bit and a video of it in use in another elevator. So, head over there and stay safe!

Working From Home Amid COVID-19 Concerns

Fujitec Elevators & Escalators, headquartered in Japan with operational headquarters worldwide, recently posted on LinkedIn a photo collage of its sales team members working from home, observing that “safety of our employees is our topmost priority. However, our sales team continues to #stayathome and work with full enthusiasm to keep up our customer commitments.”

The Fujitec sales team working from home; image courtesy of Fujitec

Fighting Coronavirus

As the epicenter of the coronavirus outbreak, China has taken numerous steps to try to contain the spread of the disease. Elevators have been one focal point in the country’s efforts. For example, the photos above sent by ELEVATOR WORLD Correspondent Peng Jie show elevator buttons covered with plastic wrap to protect them from twice-daily spraying of disinfectant, plus record sheets on the wall to certify the cleaning has been done. Peng tells us, “We have been affected in work and daily life since January. Schools and universities remain closed, the same with restaurants and most shops. People are advised to stay at home and go out as [little] as possible. Temperatures are measured everywhere.”

The South China Morning Post reports that people are using objects — such as lighters, or even toothpicks — to press elevator buttons. The article notes that some buildings have adopted voice-controlled systems. Giving a nod to “the most innovative solution so far,” the newspaper relates that holographic buttons are in use in at least one elevator in the eastern city of Hefei. Riders simply press the “button” for their floor. The maker of the system, Easpeed, said it has received more than 100 orders for its touchless elevator button system, which sells for about US$2,163.

On a promising note, KOYO Elevator posted on its LinkedIn page the photo below along with a note that its factory in Kunshan, China, has resumed production, adding, “The epidemic in China has been effectively controlled,” and that company leadership “attached great importance to the timely shipment of goods.”

Back at work at KOYO Elevator’s factory